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Archive for the ‘heart disease’ Category

While increasing fruit and vegetable consumption remains a national priority, a new international survey has revealed the extent to which people are not meeting government guidelines on diet and nutrition in the UK.

Current recommendations are that everyone should eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables each day to reduce the risks of cancer, coronary heart disease and many other chronic diseases. The reality in the UK is that only 11% believe they actually achieve their 5 a day in a week.

The 2010 survey for Herbalife, revealed that 60% claimed their job or lifestyle made it too difficult to eat their 5 a day, despite accepting the benefits of balanced nutrition, while only 24% took nutritional supplements just in case.

While the most recent trends data suggest that women achieve more portions per day than men, this latest survey actually shows that women find it more difficult than men to include the recommended number of portions a day into their diet.

Women are notoriously more prone to stress eating than men and are more likely to develop unhealthy habits such as snacking on high sugar, high fat snacks when they juggle life or work long hours. More women than men blamed the expense of budgeting for 5 a day even though 93% of all women respondents considered the associated health benefits to be important.

But then there was still some confusion about what the government’s recommendations actually constituted. Over 75% incorrectly believed that eating 5 pieces of fruit would qualify. Dinner was considered to be the meal of least importance to both men and women in achieving 5 a day. Snacking was considered to be the most important with over one third seeing it as the most important way of getting their 5 portions a day.

Says Gavin Aley at Herbalife, “It’s clear that with today’s busy lifestyles most people still struggle to achieve their 5-a-day through fruit and vegetables. Real life demands a fast, simple, convenient alternative and that’s where nutritional supplements can help to support a healthy, balanced diet”.

Source – Herbalife

Article from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/182669.php

To find out more about the full range of Herbalife Nutritional supplements, visit our online store

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There has been a “dramatic rise” in deaths in England in which obesity was a contributory factor, figures suggest.

Analysis of death certificates by a University of Oxford team found a year-on-year increase in obesity-related deaths between 2000 and 2006. In addition recent ministerial figures show 757 obesity related deaths in 2009, compared with 358 in 2000.

It comes as the Scottish government warned of a “ticking time bomb”, saying 40% of Scots could be obese by 2030.

The analysis of death certificate trends published in the European Journal of Public Health showed an average annual rise obesity mentions on death certificates of 8% for men and 4% for women. But there were likely to be many more such deaths where obesity was not recorded, the researchers said. One public health expert said people often did not realise obesity was linked with many serious conditions.

The researchers said as obesity was rarely listed as the main cause of death, a simple snapshot of death certificates would not have picked up the rise. The marked increase was apparent when they included contributing causes of death in the analysis.

Other figures recently released by ministers showed more than 190 people under 65 died as a direct result of obesity in 2009 compared with 88 in 2000. When contributing factors were included, there were 757 obesity related deaths in 2009 compared with 358 in 2000.

Recognition

About a quarter of adults in the UK are now obese. Obesity and problems caused by being overweight are thought to cost the NHS more than £3bn a year.

The Scottish government said 40% of Scots could be classed as obese by 2030, if things do not change. Scotland’s Public Health Minister Shona Robison is due to launch an anti-obesity strategy later.

Study leader Professor Michael Goldacre said although the death certificate figures tallied with rises in levels of obesity in the population over the same period, they did not know before the study whether doctors would be recording obesity on death certificates. “We know for example obesity contributes to heart disease but if someone dies of heart disease you don’t necessarily expect doctors to note if they were obese. “But this shows doctors are increasingly recognising obesity as a cause of death.” He added: “One of the key messages is you can’t rely on underlying causes alone – if you don’t look at other causes you cannot see what is contributing to disease.”

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, president of the Faculty of Public Health, said people in the “early stages” of obesity did not often realise how dangerous being overweight could be and their weight commonly “creeps up” without them noticing. People do not realise how closely linked it is with serious conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and diabetes. We have to take obesity seriously.”

The British Medical Association called for urgent action to address soaring obesity rates.

BBC News – Obesity rise on death certificates, researchers say.

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fat-bellyExperts from Oxford University have published an article in the medical journal The Lancet detailing their findings that being obese is as hazardous to your health as a lifetime of smoking.

The report suggests that even moderate obesity can shorten your life expectancy by a few years. About 25% of UK adults are considered obese with a BMI of over 30.

BMI, or Body Mass Index, is a measurement that uses a scientific formula to determine an adult person’s safest, healthiest weight based upon their weight and height. BMI is a powerful tool you can use to help create your personal path to improved health as a high BMI can be associated with serious health risks including:

  • obesity
  • heart disease
  • diabetes
  • cancer

What is your personal BMI calculation?

Click here to find out using the online BMI calculator from our international store!

Your BMI can be a good starting point, but you should also consider your body composition (ie fat vs lean muscle tissue and water) and also your body shape. If you are especially muscular, are pregnant or breastfeeding, then your BMI will not be an accurate refelction of your health risks. See our previous post on body shape when determining your overall health risks.

If you are interested in a Personal Wellness Evaluation from SK Nutrition, or you’d like advice on incorporating the Herbalife Weight Management or Nutrition Programmes into your healthy lifestyle, contact us via our website.

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You can read the BBC’s coverage of the Oxford University report by clicking here.

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As a reasonable proportion of SK Nutrition clients are looking to improve their risk factors in relation to heart disease, through improved lifestyle and eating habits, I thought the following article may be of interest to you.

It is not clear why it’s the case, but it seems that having a sibling with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is bad news for your own odds of developing CVD. It seems that an early shared environment may be a factor, with people developing poor eating or exercise habits in childhood that continue into their adult lives, but further research is needed.

In case you missed the article, here is the link to the BBC’s coverage: BBC NEWS | Health | Sibling link to heart health risk.

If you are interested in finding out more about the Herbalife Healthy Heart programme, please feel free to contact us or you can visit the Targeted Nutrition page of our website for specialist items that combine with our core products to help support your heart health.

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milAfter recently reading that stress from bad leadership at work can harm your health, it may come as little surprise to some that scientists have now discovered that living with your husband’s mother can damage your health too!!!

Here is an extract from the article I came across today:

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Some shocking statistics in The Times today about the continued rise in diabetes, which I thought worth sharing:

The number of people who will die as a result of diabetes is forecast to rise from one in ten to one in seven in less than 20 years unless obesity rates can be reduced significantly.

Costs to the National Health Service of treating the disease are expected to rise by a third by 2025 as the number of people suffering from diabetes reaches a record level. Patients needing treatment for conditions linked to diabetes already cost the NHS £9 billion annually, and the figure is forecast to rise to £12 billion, before inflation, by 2025.

(more…)

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There are few things more delicious than a fresh crispy apple and farmers markets and shops are full of fantastic British apples at the moment. We have all heard that “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” but you may not realise that there is a good reason for this phrase – apples really are full of goodness!

Here are some apple facts that are sure to get you munching: (more…)

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