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Archive for the ‘longevity’ Category

There has been a “dramatic rise” in deaths in England in which obesity was a contributory factor, figures suggest.

Analysis of death certificates by a University of Oxford team found a year-on-year increase in obesity-related deaths between 2000 and 2006. In addition recent ministerial figures show 757 obesity related deaths in 2009, compared with 358 in 2000.

It comes as the Scottish government warned of a “ticking time bomb”, saying 40% of Scots could be obese by 2030.

The analysis of death certificate trends published in the European Journal of Public Health showed an average annual rise obesity mentions on death certificates of 8% for men and 4% for women. But there were likely to be many more such deaths where obesity was not recorded, the researchers said. One public health expert said people often did not realise obesity was linked with many serious conditions.

The researchers said as obesity was rarely listed as the main cause of death, a simple snapshot of death certificates would not have picked up the rise. The marked increase was apparent when they included contributing causes of death in the analysis.

Other figures recently released by ministers showed more than 190 people under 65 died as a direct result of obesity in 2009 compared with 88 in 2000. When contributing factors were included, there were 757 obesity related deaths in 2009 compared with 358 in 2000.

Recognition

About a quarter of adults in the UK are now obese. Obesity and problems caused by being overweight are thought to cost the NHS more than £3bn a year.

The Scottish government said 40% of Scots could be classed as obese by 2030, if things do not change. Scotland’s Public Health Minister Shona Robison is due to launch an anti-obesity strategy later.

Study leader Professor Michael Goldacre said although the death certificate figures tallied with rises in levels of obesity in the population over the same period, they did not know before the study whether doctors would be recording obesity on death certificates. “We know for example obesity contributes to heart disease but if someone dies of heart disease you don’t necessarily expect doctors to note if they were obese. “But this shows doctors are increasingly recognising obesity as a cause of death.” He added: “One of the key messages is you can’t rely on underlying causes alone – if you don’t look at other causes you cannot see what is contributing to disease.”

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, president of the Faculty of Public Health, said people in the “early stages” of obesity did not often realise how dangerous being overweight could be and their weight commonly “creeps up” without them noticing. People do not realise how closely linked it is with serious conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and diabetes. We have to take obesity seriously.”

The British Medical Association called for urgent action to address soaring obesity rates.

BBC News – Obesity rise on death certificates, researchers say.

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Some shocking statistics in The Times today about the continued rise in diabetes, which I thought worth sharing:

The number of people who will die as a result of diabetes is forecast to rise from one in ten to one in seven in less than 20 years unless obesity rates can be reduced significantly.

Costs to the National Health Service of treating the disease are expected to rise by a third by 2025 as the number of people suffering from diabetes reaches a record level. Patients needing treatment for conditions linked to diabetes already cost the NHS £9 billion annually, and the figure is forecast to rise to £12 billion, before inflation, by 2025.

(more…)

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Another interesting article from the BBC Health News webpages today: A vitamin found in meat, fish and milk may help stave off memory loss in old age, a study has suggested.

Older people with lower than average vitamin B12 levels were more than six times more likely to experience brain shrinkage, researchers concluded. The University of Oxford study, published in the journal Neurology, tested the 107 apparently healthy volunteers over a five-year period.

Some studies suggest two out of five people are deficient in the vitamin. (more…)

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Q: What are the specific nutritional requirements of people aged 50 or above, and how can Herbalife’s core products help fulfil these requirements?

A: When it comes to getting older, our bodies change and that affects our physical and nutritional requirements. (more…)

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Having discovered my all-time favourite website – www.ted.com – this weekend, I thought I’d share one of the many fascinating talks from it.

In a sobering 3-minute talk, Dr. Dean Ornish tracks the dramatic spread of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease around the globe — as people outside the US start to eat, live and die like Americans do. “This may be the first generation in which our kids live a shorter lifespan than we do,” Ornish says. The good news? These trends are preventable and even reversible through diet and exercise.

Click here to watch the short video.

Dean Ornish is a clinical professor at UCSF and founder of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute. He’s a leading expert on fighting illness – particularly heart disease with dietary and lifestyle changes. There are a number of other talks from Dr Ornish on TED.com.

If you’d like help in putting together a personal wellness programme to assist you with weight control or all-round nutritional support feel free to contact me or you can browse the range of Herbalife Total Nutrition products at our online store:

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Regardless of how fat or poor you are, four key changes could add 14 years to your life, a major study finds – click on this link to read the article in full.

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